The First Amendment and Occupy Wall Street’s Occupation of Zuccotti Park

November 6, 2011 | Comments Off on The First Amendment and Occupy Wall Street’s Occupation of Zuccotti Park

by Tony Guo Introduction Over Fall Break I visited my fiancée in New York City.  As part of my visit we went to Washington Square Park.  We both graduated from New York University and Washington Square Park is a second home to us.  It was the first place I met my fiancée.  Before I graduated […]

A New Approach to Prisoner Treatment

November 13, 2009 | Comments Off on A New Approach to Prisoner Treatment

Statistics about America’s prison system are disturbing.The United States has the highest prison population rate in the world; as of 2008, it was 756 inmates per 100,000 people. There were 2,310,984 inmates in American prisons and jails as of June 2008.  This number has quadrupled since 1980, due not to an increase in violent crimes […]

On the Slippery Slope to Gay Marital Bliss

November 9, 2009 | Comments Off on On the Slippery Slope to Gay Marital Bliss

On Friday, November 6, Andrew Koppelman, the John Paul Stevens Professor of Law at Northwestern, visited William & Mary School of Law and gave a talk on gay marriage. His speech was presented by the Institute of Bill of Rights Law and the American Constitution Society. Koppelman stated that the gay marriage movement is one […]

Go to School, Lose Your Rights?

March 25, 2009 | Comments Off on Go to School, Lose Your Rights?

How far can public schools go in trying to enforce their anti-drug (or anti-weapon) policy?  That question is coming before the Supreme Court on April 21.  That particular case involves a 13-year-old girl who was strip-searched at her Arizona public middle school because she was suspected of having prescription strength ibuprofen.  Savana Redding was stripped […]

Some Truths About Guantánamo Bay

March 16, 2009 | Comments Off on Some Truths About Guantánamo Bay

Guest Blogger: Lawrence Wilkerson There are several dimensions to the debate over the U.S. prison facilities at Guantánamo Bay, Cuba that the media have largely missed and, thus, of which the American people are almost completely unaware.  For that matter, few within the government who were not directly involved are aware either. The first of […]

Secret Courts Multiply in the U.S.

February 16, 2009 | Comments Off on Secret Courts Multiply in the U.S.

Mohamed v. Jeppesen Dataplan, Inc Oral arguments available here (audio .wma). Mohamed, and 4 other plaintiffs, are suing an airline for transporting him around the world, against his will, for the purpose of subjecting him to the torture of foreign governments. Apparently he has some pretty damning quotes which (if believed) make it as clear […]

Maybe Cruel, Definitely Unusual

February 3, 2009 | Comments Off on Maybe Cruel, Definitely Unusual

After a one day trial, 13-year-old Joe Sullivan was convicted of burglary and rape, and sentenced to life without the possibility of parole.  He and his friends had burglarized the house of an elderly woman, and she was raped, though it is unclear whether Sullivan was the rapist.  Now 33, Sullivan is asking the Supreme […]

Excluding the Exclusionary Rule

February 2, 2009 | Comments Off on Excluding the Exclusionary Rule

A couple of weeks ago, the Supreme Court announced its decision in Herring v. United States, providing for limitations on the application of the Exclusionary Rule in cases of police negligence. The ruling is ill-conceived, but certainly not outrageous. However, in a few pieces of dicta in his opinion, Chief Justice John Roberts seems to […]

Coming and Going; the Going Part: Saucier Overruled

January 22, 2009 | Comments Off on Coming and Going; the Going Part: Saucier Overruled

Yesterday, in Pearson v. Callahan, the Supreme Court overruled Saucier v. Katz. This is a really big deal. Section 1983 makes it a crime for anyone to violate the civil rights of another citizen ‘under color of law’. Given that expansive language (which is just as expansive as it sounds), and the availability of private […]

One Step Forward, Two Steps Back

November 18, 2008 | Comments Off on One Step Forward, Two Steps Back

On May 15, 2008, the California Supreme Court struck down a California voter referendum banning same-sex marriage. It was a historic decision, and made California the second state to legalize gay marriage, after Massachusetts legalized same-sex marriage in 2004. The decision came after several gay couples filed a lawsuit claiming discrimination, and in 4-3 ruling, […]

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